Maritime Threat Picture

in collaboration with NORTH

November 17/18: Pirates fire rocket propelled grenades at container ship EVER DYNAMIC, in the Somali Basin view more

November 11: Bulk carrier boarded by pirates, southwest of Bonny Island, Nigeria view more

Saudi-led coalition relaxes blockade of Yemen's ports view more

Saudi-led coalition blockades Yemeni ports view more

Oil tanker target by armed men view more

October 31: Robbers armed with knives board oil tanker GP T2 in the Singapore Strait view more

October 31: Fishing and research vessel stolen while at anchor in Lagos view more

October 24: Stowaways board bulk carrier FRIEDERIKE in Lagos and threaten crew view more

October 21: Attackers board the container ship DEMETER and kidnap six seafarers, Gulf of Guinea view more

Risk: Syrian sanctions view more

IRAN - Risk: Iranian Sanctions view more

Threat: Vessel attack and kidnap of seafarers view more

LIBYA - Risk: fines issued for delays in discharging at Misurata, Libya view more

Risk: Drug trafficking at Puerto Cabello, Lake Maracaibo and Orinoco River ports view more

ALGERIA - Risk: Customs fines in Algeria view more

VIETNAM - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in Vietnam view more

Ice-conditions at Ukrainian ports view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Hull staining at Dakar, Senegal view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Drug trafficking in West African ports view more

SUDAN - Risk: Damage and shortage claims for bagged cargo in Port Sudan view more

UAE - Risk Possible delays caused by disembarking crew due to injury or sickness at Fujairah, UAE view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: unrest by elements of the security forces leading to disruption to port operations. view more

PERU - Risk: Robbers target ships in Callao's anchorages view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Economic crisis bringing delays and deteriorating port conditions. There are also reports of piracy, the targets being small fishing vessels. view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines imposed for sewage treatment plant effluent non-compliance view more

CHINA - Risk: Theft from ships in Tianjin anchorage view more

GUINEA - Risk: armed robbery at Conakry Anchorage view more

PHILIPPINES AND BORNEO - Threat: Attacks on vessels and kidnap of crew view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Delays due to hull cleaning in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Fines for inaccurate bunker customs declarations in the port of Dakar, Senegal view more

INDIA - Risk: Fines and delays for seafarers failing to submit a Yellow Fever vaccination certificate in Mumbai, India view more

EGYPT - Risk: Fines and delays for breaching Suez Canal rules, Egypt view more

EGYPT- Risk: Fines for fender damage claims in Egyptian ports view more

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - Risk: Fines for unauthorised transit through marine reserve areas view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Grounding in the Parana River, Argentina view more

PERU - Risk: Unexpected charges for sludge removal services at ports in Peru view more

SAUDI ARABIA & UAE Risk: Infection from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome - Corona Virus (MERS-CoV) view more

MEXICO - Risk: Shipper's surveyor forcing Masters to accept pre-prepared non-clausable mate's receipts at Veracruz, Mexico view more

URUGUAY - Risk: Fines and delays for non-compliance with Uruguayan Oil Spill Response Organisation (OSRO) contract requirements view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Navigation through the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, Australia view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines for undeclared waste lube oils in Argentina view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines for short landing fertilizer cargoes in Argentina view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and delays for carrying out non-approved Ship to Ship (STS) operations in Angolan waters view more

LIBYA - Risk: United States Coast Guard imposes further conditions of entry for vessels arriving from Libyan ports view more

LIBYA - Risk: Ship arrest for loading banned illicit crude oil from Libya view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with Hong Kong - Air Pollution Control (Ocean Going Vessels) (Fuel at Berth) Regulations view more

USA - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with MARPOL Annex VI within the US Emission Control Area view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Self heating petroleum coke at Amuay Terminal, Venezuela view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Vessels grounding in the approaches to Douala port, Cameroon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines following illegal discharges into the Bohai Sea and China's inland waterways view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Detentions and delays arising from Port State Control (PSC) inspections and non-compliance with MLC 2006 regulations view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Cape Town view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Ballast water sampling requirements, Ukraine view more

CHINA - Risk: The collection of tax from non-resident taxpayers engaged in international transportation business with China view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Potential shortage claims when loading bulk sulphur at Jubail, Saudi Arabia view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of paper shortage claims in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Ship arrest and customs fines as a result of fabricated coal cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BULGARIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Varna, Bulgaria view more

ROMANIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Constantza, Romania view more

CHINA - Risk: Navigation danger due to expansion of aquaculture at Lanshan, China view more

CANADA - Risk: Ice navigation in Canadian waters during the winter months view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines, Port State Control detentions and delays for breaching regulations for passing through the Qiongzhou Straits, China view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in customs documentation at Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Misdeclared metallic iron content of Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) cargoes at San Felix, Venezuela view more

MALAYSIA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Kuantan, Malaysia, may be prone to liquefaction view more

GHANA - Risk: Fines imposed for the landing of stowaways in Takoradi, Ghana view more

GABON - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in port clearance documentation at Port Gentil, Gabon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fertilizer loaded in Chinese ports susceptible to caking and contamination view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Delays resulting from port officials' refusal to land stowaways at Abidjan and San Pedro, Cote d'Ivoire view more

CHINA - Risk: Danger to navigation due to sea ice in the Baohai Sea, China view more

KUWAIT - Risk: Claims arising from grain cargo shortages in Shuwaikh port, Kuwait view more

CHINA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of fluorspar cargoes in China view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Bulk liquid cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BRAZIL - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Trombetas, Brazil may be prone to liquefaction view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Grain cargo shortage claims at Saudi Arabian ports view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Damages and shortage claims for bagged rice cargoes to Luanda view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Potential mis-declaration of Indonesian nickel ore cargoes in Indonesia view more

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - Risk: US Environmental Protection Agency fines for noncompliance with MARPOL Annex VI low sulphur content fuels. view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Black-listing and possible ship arrest resulting from previously visiting Crimean ports view more

THAILAND - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of loading/discharging dangerous goods without permission from Thailand's Marine Safety and Environment Bureau/Harbour Department view more

CHINA/TAIWAN - Risk: Fines imposed for unapproved direct sailing between China and Taiwan view more

TURKEY - Risk: Fines for short landing of cargo at Turkish ports view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for emitting dark smoke in the port of Hong Kong view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Fraudulent Port State Control (PSC) inspection charges in Indonesia view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Issues associated with loading iron ore cargo from Pepel port and Freetown anchorage view more

GHANA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Takoradi may be prone to liquefaction view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Problems associated with the loading of bauxite on the Sherbro River, Sierra Leone view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Durban view more

NORTH AMERICA - Risk: Delays due to the discovery of Asian Gypsy Moth in Canada and the USA view more

SUDAN - Risk: Regular shortage claims following the discharge of bulk wheat at Port Sudan view more

ALGERIA -Risk: Customs fines due to shortage claims for grain cargoes shipped to Algeria view more

INDIA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of iron ore cargoes in Goa, India view more

MEXICO - Risk: Delays, ship arrest and problems loading iron ore cargo in Mexican ports view more

MEXICO - Risk: Drug cartel activity and acts of violence in and around Mexican port cities view more

South America - Risk: Drug Trafficking throughout South America view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Ships anchoring in South African coastal waters are obliged to first obtain permission from the South African Maritime Safety Authority view more

YEMEN - Risk: Sanctions and the US Department of the Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List for Yemen view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities forbid the landing of stowaways at the port of Dakar view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of exaggerated cargo claims at the port of Douala view more

BENIN - Risk: Exaggerated shortage claims resulting in customs fines view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, delays and detention as a result of differences in oil record books and shipboard retention of oils, Yemen view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fabricated stevedore personal Injury claims in Yemeni ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and possible delays as a result of late reporting of Fixed and Floating Object (FFO) claims in Yemen view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Bagged rice shortage claims in West African ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship security as a result of the civil war in Yemen view more

GHANA - Risk: Stowaways at Tema Port view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: associated with discharging bulk rice at ports in Sierra Leone view more

JORDAN - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in the port of Aqaba view more

LIBYA - Risk: status of, and security at, Libyan Ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of exaggerated cargo shortage claims in Yemen view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Possible ship detention by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority as a consequence of using non-approved navigation charts in Australian waters view more

COLOMBIA - Risk: Possible delays caused by the Colombian Navy carrying out routine anti-drug trafficking searches in Colombia's ports (Puerto Bolivar, Puerto Neuvo and Puerto Drummond) view more

LIBYA - Risk: Sanctions and US Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List, Libya view more

YEMEN - Risk: Unexpected expenses and fines arising from the shifting of vessels, arrival draught restrictions and exceeding time allotted for discharge in Hodeida view more

TURKEY - Risk: Issues associated with loading steel products in Turkish ports view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Delays caused by ship detentions due to the discovery of armaments on board merchant vessels in South Africa view more

TUNISA - Risk: P&I claims and customs fines arising from short landing of cargo in Tunisian ports. view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities robustly impose customs fines on vessels calling at Dakar view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Delays on the Parana River Argentina view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Restricted availability of bunkers at Dakar roads, Senegal view more

THAILAND - Risk: Problems associated with loading bulk and bagged sugar in Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Old, damaged bagged rice from Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Potential damage to bagged rice due to dunnaging in Thailand view more

NIGERIA – Risk: Nigerian navy arrest vessels employing the services of armed security guards view more

SUDAN - Risk: Fraudulent steel transactions to Port Sudan view more

TAIWAN - Risk: Damage to nets and equipment, safe transit of the coastal fishing zones of Taiwan view more

GUATEMALA - Risk: Nickel ore can liquefy due to excessive moisture content view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines in Argentina relating to the misdeclaration of ship's stores view more

USA - Risk: merchant vessels subject to fines and severe delays due to illegal contraband carriage, particularly from the port of Miami and Port Everglades view more

CARIBBEAN - Risk: commercial vessels being used to traffic and smuggle contraband in the Caribbean Basin, particularly to and from the Port of Spain, Trinidad, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico and Jamaica view more

ECUADOR - Risk: Drug trafficking, theft and piracy at the Ecuadorian port of Guayaquil and Puerto Bolivar view more

SPAIN - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband from North and West Africa though Algeciras (Spain) into European black markets view more

THE NETHERLANDS AND BELGIUM - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband through the major shipping hubs of Antwerp and Rotterdam view more

LIBYA & SYRIA - Risk: Implications of the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean view more

SOMALIA - Risk: Somali-based pirates targeting vessels operating in the littoral waters of Somalia, the Indian ocean and Gulf of Oman view more

INDONESIA AND PHILIPPINES - Risk: nickel ore liquefaction due to excessive moisture content during voyages from the Philippines and Indonesia view more

INDONESIA - Threat: armed robbery on ships berthed at the Indonesian anchorages of Tanjung Priok, Dumai, Belawan and Taboneo view more

MALACCA STRAITS & SINGAPORE - Threat: vessel hijack and petroleum product cargo theft in the Malacca Straits / Singapore Straits and South China Sea view more

BANGLADESH - Threat: armed robbery and pilferage on vessels anchored or berthed at Chittagong and Cox's Bazar Ports, Bangladesh view more

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Current Incidents
Enduring Risks
Listed Areas
Latest Incidents
17/11/2017 Posn -1.95 - 44.82

Background

Pirates fired rocket propelled grenades at a container ship as it passed through waters south of Somalia on its way to the Kenyan port of Mombasa.

The pirates also attacked a fishing boat operating in the same waters.

Details of the incidents have been released by EU NAVFOR, the European Union naval force patrolling sea areas off the Horn of Africa and in the Western Indian Ocean.

EU NAVFOR named the container ship as the Evergreen operated, 4,211 TEU capacity, MV EVER DYNAMIC.

The fishing vessel was identified as the 2,949 deadweight-tonne (dwt) Seychelles-flagged GALERNA III.

EU NAVFOR said the attacks took place over a 24 hour period during the weekend of November 17/18.

A statement from the naval force said it had detained six people suspected of being responsible for the attack and that it had seized their skiff and a whaler believed to have been used as their mother ship.

No one was injured in the attacks and the container ship and the fishing vessel were undamaged.

Assessment and Analysis

The European Union naval force (EU NAVFOR) said the presence of a security team on one of the vessels, combined with good seamanship and adherence to BMP4 (Best Management Practices for Protection against Somali Based Piracy), had helped thwart the pirates.

It added that information from the masters of the vessels had helped trigger a swift response and to identify the perpetrators.

“A reminder is made to all seafarers that adherence to BMP4 and registration with MSCHOA (Maritime Security Centre – Horn of Africa) will help to overcome further illegal acts at sea,” said a EU NAVOR statement.

“The presence of international counter-piracy forces in the area will continue to act as a deterrent to further incidents.”

The number of piracy attacks off the Somali coast have fallen sharply in recent years but a series of incidents in the first months of 2017, including the hijacking of the tanker ARIS 13, were a reminder that the threat of piracy remains.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

14/11/2017 Posn 4.07 - 6.59

Background

The International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre has reported another attack by armed pirates in Nigerian waters.

The incident happened on November 11 some 17 nautical miles (nm) southwest of Bonny Island.

According to an incident report on the IMB’s website, pirates boarded a bulk carrier and entered the bridge, firing their weapons and damaging the windows.

They stole personal belongings and ship’s equipment before kidnapping ten crew members and escaping in their boat.

Two Nigerian navy vessels, however, intercepted the pirates.

Navy teams were able to rescue the crew. Five pirates were arrested.

The bulk carrier involved has been reported by some sources, to be the VENUS BAY, which was in the vicinity at the time.

Assessment and Analysis

The attack comes less than three weeks after reports that armed pirates had boarded a crude oil tanker off the Nigerian coast.

In that attack too prompt action by the Nigerian navy prevented the situation escalating .

Waters in and off Nigeria, however, remain risky.

The latest quarterly pirate report from the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) says there were 20 confirmed attacks against ships in waters off Nigeria in the first nine months of 2017.

Of those attacks, 16 occurred off the coast of Brass, Bonny and Bayelsa. At least 39 seamen are known to have been kidnapped.

The number of attacks in and around Nigerian waters is probably even higher as many attacks go unreported.

Attackers are often well armed and violent.

Crews are advised to be vigilant and to take extra security precautions.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

14/11/2017 Posn 12.74 - 45.02

Background

The Saudi -led coalition intervening in Yemen’s civil war has lifted what it said would be a total blockade of Yemen’s ports.

Saudi Arabia’s United Nations mission on Monday (November 13) said the ports of Aden, Mukalla and Mokha would be allowed to reopen for humanitarian aid and commercial cargo.

All three ports are in territory controlled by the Saudi-backed Yemen government.

For ports in areas controlled by Iran-allied Houthi rebels, and that includes the port of Hodeidah, Saudi Arabia called for a new mechanism to prevent the smuggling of weapons and cash.

Saudi Arabia announced on November 6 that it was closing all Yemen’s ports.

It said the move was in response to a missile attack by Houthi forces against the international airport in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

Saudi Arabia accuses Iran of supplying the rebels with missiles, a charge Iran denies.

 

 

Assessment and Analysis

Saudi Arabia was under pressure to lift the blockade from the moment it was announced.

The United Nations and the Red Cross warned of a ‘catastrophic’ situation for the millions of people in Yemen who relied on aid shipments.

The blockade also triggered fresh warnings from the leader of the Houthi rebels. “We will take measures we have not taken before and we can target oil ships. We can do anything,” he was quoted as saying.

The situation in the region is fluid and the threat to shipping can change rapidly.

Ship operators should carry out detailed risk assessments for each voyage into the area.

Ships sailing through the parts of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden that are designated a High Risk Area (HRA) should register with the Maritime Security Centre – Horn of Africa (MSC-HOA).

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

08/11/2017 Posn 14.77 - 42.79

Background

The Saudi-led coalition intervening in Yemen’s civil war has closed access to Yemeni ports.

Saudi Arabia announced the blockade on Monday, November 6.

It said the blockade of the ports would be temporary and would take into account the work of humanitarian and aid organisations.

It called on ‘all relevant parties’ to comply with inspection procedures, details of which would be announced later.

Meanwhile sources in Yemen said that ships anchored and awaiting berths at  the ports of Hodeidah and Saleef  had been ordered to leave the anchorages and proceed to an area outside port limits.

As of November 7, ships already at berth working cargo were exempt from the order.

Hodeidah and Saleef are both on Yemen’s Red Sea coast and are in the control of Iran-aligned Houthi rebels.

As of November 9, it has been announced, that The Port of Aden, being under the control of Yemen’s Saudi-backed government is exempt from the closure order.

Assessment and Analysis

The Saudi decision to blockade Yemen’s ports and airports came after the launch of a missile against the Saudi capital Riyadh on November 4.

The missile, which was intercepted, was fired by Houthi rebels.

Saudi Arabia claims that Iran has been providing the rebels with missiles, a charge Iran denies.

Saudi Arabia came under immediate pressure to lift the blockade with the United Nations and the Red Cross warning of a ‘catastrophic’ situation for the millions of people who rely on aid shipments.

Saudi Arabia has given no details of how long the blockade will last, beyond saying it is temporary, or how aid shipments will be vetted.

Violence linked to the Yemen civil war appears to be escalating.

Militants linked to Islamic State stormed a security building in Aden on November 5, killing at least 17 people.

In September a Houthi rebel leader warned that Saudi oil tankers could be targeted should Saudi Arabia attack Hodeidah.

The situation in the region is fluid and the threat to shipping can change rapidly.

Ship operators should carry out detailed risk assessments for each voyage into the area.

Ships sailing through the parts of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden that are designated a High Risk Area (HRA) should register with the Maritime Security Centre – Horn of Africa (MSC-HOA).

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

01/11/2017 UTC Posn 3.35 - 6.49

Background

The International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre has published details of a pirate attack on a crude oil tanker underway off the coast of Nigeria.

The attack took place on October 25 shortly after nightfall.

According to the report on the IMB’s website armed pirates approached the tanker in a speedboat.

The tanker’s 23 crew members retreated into the vessel’s citadel and contacted the owners for help.

The IMB Reporting Centre said it received the message and immediately contacted the Nigerian Navy.

A Nigerian warship was dispatched and went alongside the tanker.

The crew emerged from the citadel and a search was initiated. No pirates were found.

The tanker was then escorted by the Nigerian warship until it had left waters designated as a High Risk Area.

 

Assessment and Analysis

All waters in and off Nigeria remain risky, despite the efforts the Nigerian Navy.

The latest quarterly pirate report from the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) says there were 20 confirmed attacks against ships in waters off Nigeria in the first nine months of 2017.

Of those attacks, 16 occurred off the coast of Brass, Bonny and Bayelsa. At least 39 seamen are known to have been kidnapped.

The number of attacks in and around Nigerian waters is probably even higher as many attacks go unreported.

Attackers are often well armed and violent.

Crews are advised to be vigilant and to take extra security precautions.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

31/10/2017 LC Posn 1.17 - 104.14

Background

Five robbers armed with knives have boarded an oil tanker in the Singapore Strait.

They went to the ship’s engine room where they tied up the duty oiler before stealing some engine spare parts and escaping in a small boat.

The incident happened on October 30 during the early morning hours of darkness. The vessel was underway at the time.

The tanker’s position was 6.5 nautical miles (nm) north east of Terumbu Betata reef, off the north coast of Indonesia’s Batam Island.

The ship’s master raised the alarm and ordered a security search of the vessel but no intruders remained on-board.

The tanker’s crew were uninjured and the vessel, the 107,176 deadweight tonne (dwt) GP T2, was able to proceed to its next port of call in China.

 

Assessment and Analysis

Attacks against vessels in the Singapore Strait appear to be on the increase.

According to ReCAAP (the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia) this was the seventh such incident in the Strait since the start of 2017.

By contrast, in the first ten months of 2016, ReCAAP received reports of only two incidents.

Vessels have been attacked by thieves both underway and at anchor.

Most of the attacks take place at night.

Ships transiting these areas should be vigilant and employ procedures to deter robbers and pirates from approaching the vessel.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

31/10/2017 Posn 6.05 - 3.42

Background

A fishing and research vessel has been stolen from an anchorage in the port of Lagos.

The 1,200 deadweight tonne (dwt) SARKI BARAKA had been donated to Nigeria’s Federal College of Fisheries and Marine Technology (FCF&MT) by the Japanese government.

It is not clear when the vessel, which was used for training purposes, was stolen.

The theft of the vessel was reported to the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMSA).

The agency’s Executive Director of Operations was quoted by Nigerian media at the end of October as saying that the vessel has been traced to Cameroon.

 

 

Assessment and Analysis

Details of the incident were still unclear when reports of the theft first appeared appeared in Nigerian media  in the last week of October.

A source at the Nigeria’s Federal College of Fisheries and Marine Technology (FCF&MT) said the vessel had been missing ‘for some time’.

The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency ((NIMSA) Executive Director of Operations welcomed what he said had been  ‘great collaboration’ within the shipping industry to trace the vessel to the neighboring country of Cameroon.

There were no reports of any arrests, nor was it clear if the vessel would be returned to Nigeria.

Vessels visiting Lagos should take extra precautions. Among other things, crew members  should maintain a good visual and radar watch for the approach of small craft.

Other precautions should include illuminating the ship’s sides at night and securing and stowing away ladders and ropes.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

24/10/2017 Posn 6.31 - 3.42

Background

Four stowaways, who are thought to have boarded a bulk carrier in Nigeria, have been arrested after the vessel’s crew called for assistance.

The 57,400 deadweight tonne (dwt) FRIEDERIKE was underway between Lagos and Buenos Aires when the captain sent a distress call on October 21 saying, among other things, that the stowaways had threatened the crew.

The Uruguayan Navy responded, advising the bulk carrier to proceed to an anchorage southeast of Montevideo where it was met by a frigate.

A unit from Uruguay’s Naval Fusiliers Corps was sent aboard and the stowaways were arrested and taken to Montevideo.

The bulk carrier was later allowed to resume its voyage to Argentina.

Assessment and Analysis

African ports continue to present major problems in terms of stowaways and Lagos in Nigeria is one of the favourite ports for boarding attempts.

The West of England P&I club reported in 2017 that it knew of several cases in recent years where groups of more than ten people at a time had made attempts to stowaway.

In the 12 months to August 2017 its members reported seven stowaway incidents in Lagos involving 48 individuals.

Vessels visiting Lagos should take extra precautions to prevent unauthorised access.That includes maintaining a good visual and radar watch for the approach of small craft, illuminating the ship’s sides at night and securing and stowing away ladders and ropes.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

21/10/2017 UTC Posn 3.47 - 7.03

Background

Pirates have boarded a container ship in the Gulf of Guinea and kidnapped the captain and five of the crew.

Reports say eight armed men boarded the ship after an exchange of gunfire.

They left the vessel in a black speedboat, taking their hostages with them.

The 12 remaining members of the container ship’s crew were unharmed.

The incident happened just before dawn on October 21.

The vessel under attack was the 3,100 TEU capacity container ship DEMETER.

Its position at the time was some 50 nautical miles south-west of Bonny, Nigeria.

The Liberia-flagged vessel is owned by German shipping firm the Peter Doehle Group.

 

Assessment and Analysis

Hijacks and crew abductions off the Nigerian coast remain a serious problem.

Some reports say the attackers involved in the latest abductions could be from the same group that tried to board a supply vessel in Nigerian waters on October 20.

Meanwhile, the latest quarterly pirate report from the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) says there were 20 confirmed attacks against ships in waters off Nigeria in the first nine months of 2017.

Of those attacks, 16 occurred off the coast of Brass, Bonny and Bayelsa. At least 39 seamen are known to have been kidnapped.

The number of attacks in and around Nigerian waters is probably even higher as many attacks go unreported.

The area remains risky for shipping, despite counter-piracy efforts by the Nigerian Navy.

Attackers are often well armed and violent.

Crews are advised to be vigilant and to take extra security precautions.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page