Maritime Threat Picture

in collaboration with NORTH

Intruders board from speedboats view more

Intruders target engine spares view more

Thieves operating in Kutubdia Anchorage view more

Saudi Arabia says ships will be protected from attack view more

Laden-Saudi VLCCs waiting in Salalah view more

Ships warned that 'whole region' at risk from contaminated bunker fuel view more

The Saudi Arabian government has issued a statement saying they have temporarily suspended oil shipments through Bab el-Mandeb Strait view more

Charity accuses bulk carrier of ignoring migrants adrift view more

Nigeria - Risk: Sharp rise in the number of vessels being boarded by intruders view more

Libya – Risk: Tankers and their crews being detained on suspicion of oil smuggling view more

NIGERIA/GULF OF GUINEA: Risk - Piracy threat in Gulf of Guinea view more

PERU - Risk: of robberies from ships in Callao view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Difficult navigation and port conditions in Abidjan view more

Threat: Hijacking and boarding for theft in South China Sea view more

MALACCA STRAIT - Risk: robbery. Maintain strict anti-piracy and robbery watches. view more

SINGAPORE STRAIT - Risk: Armed robbery whilst transiting the Singapore Strait view more

Risk: Syrian sanctions view more

IRAN - Risk: Iranian Sanctions view more

LIBYA - Risk: fines issued for delays in discharging at Misurata, Libya view more

Risk: Drug trafficking at Puerto Cabello, Lake Maracaibo and Orinoco River ports view more

ALGERIA - Risk: Customs fines in Algeria view more

VIETNAM - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in Vietnam view more

Ice-conditions at Ukrainian ports view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Hull staining at Dakar, Senegal view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Drug trafficking in West African ports view more

SUDAN - Risk: Damage and shortage claims for bagged cargo in Port Sudan view more

UAE - Risk Possible delays caused by disembarking crew due to injury or sickness at Fujairah, UAE view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Economic crisis bringing delays and deteriorating port conditions. There are also reports of piracy, the targets being small fishing vessels. view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines imposed for sewage treatment plant effluent non-compliance view more

CHINA - Risk: Theft from ships in Tianjin anchorage view more

GUINEA - Risk: armed robbery at Conakry Anchorage view more

PHILIPPINES - Theft from vessels in Manila and Batangas view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Delays due to hull cleaning in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Fines for inaccurate bunker customs declarations in the port of Dakar, Senegal view more

INDIA - Risk: Fines and delays for seafarers failing to submit a Yellow Fever vaccination certificate in Mumbai, India view more

EGYPT- Risk: Fines for fender damage claims in Egyptian ports view more

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - Risk: Fines for unauthorised transit through marine reserve areas view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Grounding in the Parana River, Argentina view more

PERU - Risk: Unexpected charges for sludge removal services at ports in Peru view more

SAUDI ARABIA & UAE Risk: Infection from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome - Corona Virus (MERS-CoV) view more

MEXICO - Risk: Shipper's surveyor forcing Masters to accept pre-prepared non-clausable mate's receipts at Veracruz, Mexico view more

URUGUAY - Risk: Fines and delays for non-compliance with Uruguayan Oil Spill Response Organisation (OSRO) contract requirements view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Navigation through the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, Australia view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines for short landing fertilizer cargoes in Argentina view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and delays for carrying out non-approved bunkering operations in Angolan waters view more

LIBYA - Risk: Ship arrest for loading banned illicit crude oil from Libya view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with Hong Kong - Air Pollution Control (Ocean Going Vessels) (Fuel at Berth) Regulations view more

USA - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with MARPOL Annex VI within the US Emission Control Area view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Self heating petroleum coke at Amuay Terminal, Venezuela view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Vessels grounding in the approaches to Douala port, Cameroon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines following illegal discharges into the Bohai Sea and China's inland waterways view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Detentions and delays arising from Port State Control (PSC) inspections and non-compliance with MLC 2006 regulations view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Cape Town view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Ballast water sampling requirements, Ukraine view more

CHINA - Risk: The collection of tax from non-resident taxpayers engaged in international transportation business with China view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Potential shortage claims when loading bulk sulphur at Jubail, Saudi Arabia view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of paper shortage claims in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Ship arrest and customs fines as a result of fabricated coal cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BULGARIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Varna, Bulgaria view more

ROMANIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Constantza, Romania view more

CHINA - Risk: Navigation danger due to expansion of aquaculture at Lanshan, China view more

CANADA - Risk: Ice navigation in Canadian waters during the winter months view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines, Port State Control detentions and delays for breaching regulations for passing through the Qiongzhou Straits, China view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in customs documentation at Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Misdeclared metallic iron content of Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) cargoes at San Felix, Venezuela view more

MALAYSIA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Kuantan, Malaysia, may be prone to liquefaction view more

GABON - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in port clearance documentation at Port Gentil, Gabon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fertilizer loaded in Chinese ports susceptible to caking and contamination view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Delays resulting from port officials' refusal to land stowaways at Abidjan and San Pedro, Cote d'Ivoire view more

CHINA - Risk: Danger to navigation due to sea ice in the Baohai Sea, China view more

KUWAIT - Risk: Claims arising from grain cargo shortages in Shuwaikh port, Kuwait view more

CHINA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of fluorspar cargoes in China view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Bulk liquid cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BRAZIL - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Trombetas, Brazil may be prone to liquefaction view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Grain cargo shortage claims at Saudi Arabian ports view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Damages and shortage claims for bagged rice cargoes to Luanda view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Potential mis-declaration of Indonesian nickel ore cargoes in Indonesia view more

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - Risk: US Environmental Protection Agency fines for noncompliance with MARPOL Annex VI low sulphur content fuels. view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Black-listing and possible ship arrest resulting from previously visiting Crimean ports view more

THAILAND - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of loading/discharging dangerous goods without permission from Thailand's Marine Safety and Environment Bureau/Harbour Department view more

TURKEY - Risk: Fines for short landing of cargo at Turkish ports view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for emitting dark smoke in the port of Hong Kong view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Fraudulent Port State Control (PSC) inspection charges in Indonesia view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Issues associated with loading iron ore cargo from Pepel port and Freetown anchorage view more

GHANA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Takoradi may be prone to liquefaction view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Problems associated with the loading of bauxite on the Sherbro River, Sierra Leone view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Durban view more

NORTH AMERICA - Risk: Delays due to the discovery of Asian Gypsy Moth in Canada and the USA view more

SUDAN - Risk: Regular shortage claims following the discharge of bulk wheat at Port Sudan view more

ALGERIA -Risk: Customs fines due to shortage claims for grain cargoes shipped to Algeria view more

INDIA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of iron ore cargoes in Goa, India view more

MEXICO - Risk: Delays, ship arrest and problems loading iron ore cargo in Mexican ports view more

MEXICO - Risk: Drug cartel activity and acts of violence in and around Mexican port cities view more

South America - Risk: Drug Trafficking throughout South America view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Ships anchoring in South African coastal waters are obliged to first obtain permission from the South African Maritime Safety Authority view more

YEMEN - Risk: Sanctions and the US Department of the Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List for Yemen view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities forbid the landing of stowaways at the port of Dakar view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of exaggerated cargo claims at the port of Douala view more

BENIN - Risk: Exaggerated shortage claims resulting in customs fines view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, delays and detention as a result of differences in oil record books and shipboard retention of oils, Yemen view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fabricated stevedore personal Injury claims in Yemeni ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and possible delays as a result of late reporting of Fixed and Floating Object (FFO) claims in Yemen view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Bagged rice shortage claims in West African ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship security as a result of the civil war in Yemen view more

GHANA - Risk: Stowaways boarding or being discovered at Tema Port or Takoradi ports, Ghana view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: associated with discharging bulk rice at ports in Sierra Leone view more

JORDAN - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in the port of Aqaba view more

LIBYA - Risk: status of, and security at, Libyan Ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of exaggerated cargo shortage claims in Yemen view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Possible ship detention by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority as a consequence of using non-approved navigation charts in Australian waters view more

COLOMBIA - Risk: Possible delays caused by the Colombian Navy carrying out routine anti-drug trafficking searches in Colombia's ports (Puerto Bolivar, Puerto Neuvo and Puerto Drummond) view more

LIBYA - Risk: Sanctions and US Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List, Libya view more

YEMEN - Risk: Unexpected expenses and fines arising from the shifting of vessels, arrival draught restrictions and exceeding time allotted for discharge in Hodeida view more

TURKEY - Risk: Issues associated with loading steel products in Turkish ports view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Delays caused by ship detentions due to the discovery of armaments on board merchant vessels in South Africa view more

TUNISA - Risk: P&I claims and customs fines arising from short landing of cargo in Tunisian ports. view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities robustly impose customs fines on vessels calling at Dakar view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Restricted availability of bunkers at Dakar roads, Senegal view more

THAILAND - Risk: Problems associated with loading bulk and bagged sugar in Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Old, damaged bagged rice from Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Potential damage to bagged rice due to dunnaging in Thailand view more

NIGERIA – Risk: Nigerian navy arrest vessels employing the services of armed security guards view more

SUDAN - Risk: Fraudulent steel transactions to Port Sudan view more

TAIWAN - Risk: Damage to nets and equipment, safe transit of the coastal fishing zones of Taiwan view more

GUATEMALA - Risk: Nickel ore can liquefy due to excessive moisture content view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines in Argentina relating to the misdeclaration of ship's stores view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Eritrea, but only South of 15º N view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Venezuela. view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Yemen view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Syria view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Saudi Arabia, excluding transit view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Lebanon view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Israel view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Iraq, including all Iraqi offshore terminals view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Iran view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: The port of Jakarata view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Pakistan view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Togo view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Somalia view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Indian Ocean / Arabian Sea / Gulf of Aden / Gulf of Oman / Southern Red Sea view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Benin view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Nigeria view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Libya view more

Joint War Committee Listed Area: Gulf of Guinea, but only the waters of the Togolese, Beninese and Nigerian Exclusive Economic Zones north of Latitude 3° N view more

USA - Risk: merchant vessels subject to fines and severe delays due to illegal contraband carriage, particularly from the port of Miami and Port Everglades view more

CARIBBEAN - Risk: commercial vessels being used to traffic and smuggle contraband in the Caribbean Basin, particularly to and from the Port of Spain, Trinidad, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico and Jamaica view more

ECUADOR - Risk: Drug trafficking, theft and piracy at the Ecuadorian port of Guayaquil and Puerto Bolivar view more

SPAIN - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband from North and West Africa though Algeciras (Spain) into European black markets view more

THE NETHERLANDS AND BELGIUM - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband through the major shipping hubs of Antwerp and Rotterdam view more

LIBYA & SYRIA - Risk: Implications of the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean view more

Pirates operating out of Somalia view more

INDONESIA AND PHILIPPINES - Risk: nickel ore liquefaction due to excessive moisture content during voyages from the Philippines and Indonesia view more

INDONESIA - Threat: of theft from ships at anchor view more

BANGLADESH - Risk of theft from ships anchoring in Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar view more

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Current Incidents
Enduring Risks
Listed Areas
Latest Incidents
13/08/2018 LC Posn 5.53 - 119.32

Background

Intruders boarded a tug sailing close to Tambisan Island in Malaysia’s Sabah state.

The crew retreated to a secure room and raised an alarm.

The intruders, who boarded from speed boats, were unable to get into the vessel’s accommodation and fled at the approach of Malaysian patrol boats.

The incident happened of August 10, shortly before dusk.

A spokesman for Malaysia’s Eastern Sabah Security Command (Esscom) told local media that around ten intruders were involved.

The crew of the tug, which was towing a barge laden with palm oil, was unharmed.

Assessment and Analysis

Initial reports from Malaysia suggested the attack had been a failed attempt to kidnap the tug’s crew for ransom.

Three days after the attack the perpetrators had yet to be identified.

According to Malaysian reports the intruders fled in their speedboats towards international waters.

Tambisan Island is 45 nautical miles (nm) from Tawi-Tawi province in the southern Philippines where government forces have been battling Abu Sayyaf, a group claiming allegiance to so-called Islamic State.

The group has a history of abducting crew and holding them for ransom but a Philippine military official said there was no evidence that the latest attack had been Abu Sayyaf inspired.

Malaysia’s Eastern Sabah Security Command (Esscom) urged all vessels in the Eastern Sabah Security Zone (Esszone) to be on high alert and update the Esscom operation centre of their position.

They were also advised to keep their Automated Identification Systems (AIS) switched on and to report their routes and schedules.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

08/08/2018 LC Posn -6.03 - 106.89

Background

Thieves stole engine spares from a bulk carrier anchored in Tanjung Priok Anchorage, Jakarta.

It is believed the vessel was boarded in the early hours of August 3.

The International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre said the thieves had boarded the vessel unnoticed and that the theft was discovered during routine rounds.

Assessment and Analysis

Thieves continue to target ships at anchor in Indonesian ports and anchorages.

Perpetrators board ships either alone or in gangs and generally operate at night. They are often armed with knives.

It is difficult to estimate how many ships have been targeted by criminals in Indonesian waters as many incidents are thought to go unreported.

The Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery in Asia (ReCAAP) recorded 30 attacks on shipping in Indonesian waters in 2017.

Most of the incidents were opportunistic with perpetrators coming alongside ships at night and clambering aboard, sometimes climbing anchor chains.

Ships are advised to use anchorages patrolled by Indonesia’s Marine Police and to maintain heightened vigilance and to report attacks and suspicious activity.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

08/08/2018 LC Posn 21.83 - 91.78

Background

Robbers using a rope attached to a hook boarded an anchored tanker at Kutubdia Anchorage, Bangladesh.

The boarding took place shortly before midnight on August 2.

According to the International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre there were six robbers.

They stole ship’s stores and escaped before an alarm was raised.

The boarding was reported to the Bangladesh Coast Guard who then made a search of the area.

Assessment and Analysis

Ships anchoring in port and in anchorages in Bangladesh are at risk of boarding.

Thieves generally operate at night, either individually or in small groups and tend to steal ship stores and other items that come to hand.

The latest incident was similar to one in early July involving a bulk carrier in the Chittagong Anchorage, some 50 kilometres to the north.

In both cases the robbers used ropes with hooks attached to board anchored vessels under cover of darkness.

There were at least 11 cases of theft from ships in Bangladesh in 2017.

Ships in Kutubdia, Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar should maintain extra watches, especially when berthed or riding at anchor.

Thieves have sometimes been armed with knives but generally flee if confronted.

If suspicious boats attempt to come alongside an alarm should be raised.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

06/08/2018 Posn 12.54 - 43.36

Background

Saudi Arabia resumed its oil shipments through the Bab-el-Mandeb strait on August 4, ten days after it said they were being suspended.

The country’s energy minister said that measures had been taken to ensure that ships would be protected from attack but gave no details as to what those measures involved.

Assessment and Analysis

Saudi Arabia had halted its oil shipments through Bab-el-Mandeb after reporting that two very large crude carriers (VLCCs) operated by Bahri (the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia) had come under attack.

Saudi reports blamed Houthi forces operating out of Yemen.

Details of the attack were not disclosed but a Saudi statement said one of the ships had sustained ‘minimal damage’.

Saudi Arabia has been leading a coalition intervening in Yemen’s civil war in support of the internationally recognised Yemeni government.

Houthi rebel forces control parts of Yemen’s Red Sea coast close to Bab-el-Mandeb. They have been blamed for at least three attacks on Saudi tankers in the southern Red Sea so far this year.

Saudi Aramco, the Saudi Arabian national oil company, confirmed that its tankers were once again moving through the strait but said it would continue to monitor the situation.

Waters off Yemen’s Red Sea and Gulf of Aden are considered a High Risk Area (HRA).

The situation is fluid and threats to shipping can change rapidly. Ship operators should carry out detailed risk assessments for each voyage into the area using the latest threat information. Useful sources include MSC-HOA, NATO Shipping Centre, UKMTO, MARLO and IMB.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

01/08/2018 Posn 12.62 - 43.34

Background

The decision by Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil company to halt oil shipments through the Bab El-Mandeb strait remained in force at the start of August.

According to data from S&P Global Platts, three part-laden very large crude carriers (VLCCs) were waiting in the Omani port of Salalah, interrupting voyages that had been expected to take them into the Red Sea.

The VLCCs are operated by Bahri (the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia).

Two other Bahri-operated VLCCs in the area were reported to have switched off their transponders.

Assessment and Analysis

The Saudi government announced on July 25 that Saudi Aramco would temporarily halt its oil shipments through Bab El-Mandeb.

It followed Saudi reports that two Bhari-operated VLCCs had been attacked by Houthi forces while moving through the Red Sea.

A Saudi statement said one of the ships had sustained ‘minimal damage’ but there had been no injuries.

There was no indication when the ban on oil shipments would be lifted. The statement said only that it would remain in force until the waterway was safe.

By the start of August no other oil exporters had followed Saudi Aramco’s example.

A Saudi-led coalition has been battling Houthi forces as part of its intervention in Yemen’s civil war.

Houthi forces control stretches of Yemen’s Red Sea coast north of Bab El-Mandeb. They have been blamed for at least two other attacks on Saudi tankers in 2018.

Days after the Saudi Aramco decision to halt oil shipments through the strait the Houthi leadership said it was ready to unilaterally halt attacks in the Red Sea to support peace efforts.

There was no immediate response from the Saudi-coalition.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

30/07/2018 Posn 1.20 - 103.90

Background

Contaminated bunker fuel with the potential to damage ships’ engines has been found in Singapore, the world’s top bunkering port.

The Singapore-based marine fuel surveyor and consulting firm Maritec Pte Ltd said it knew of six cases where fuel sold in Singapore had “resulted in severe sludging at centrifuges, clogged pipelines and overwhelmed fuel filters”.

“Fuels from Singapore are exported to all ASEAN countries and even all the way to Hong Kong,” Maritec said. “It should therefore be expected that the whole region will be affected.”

Assessment and Analysis

There were cases early in 2018 of contaminated fuel being supplied from ports in the U.S. Gulf Coast, Panama and the Dutch Antilles.

By late July it appeared that the contaminated fuels had made their way from the US Gulf and into the Asia bunker supply chain.

Singapore-based bunker traders said the fuels were hard to detect because they contained compounds – styrene and phenols – that were not generated by the refining process and were not the focus of routine tests.

According to Maritec the first problem in Asia emerged in April with a vessel that had taken on fuel in Malaysia. It lost power off the coast of Vietnam and had to be towed into port. All its fuel pumps had been damaged.

Many of the vessels that took on the tainted fuel early in 2018 required extensive flushing and repair.

The initial source of the contamination has yet to be identified.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

26/07/2018 Posn 14.783 - 41.733

Background

The Saudi Arabian government has issued a statement saying they have temporarily suspended oil shipments through Bab el-Mandeb Strait.

Khalid al-Falih, Saudi Energy Minster said in the statement sent by his ministry that two Saudi VLCCs were attacked in the Red Sea on Wednesday morning – 25 July – by Yemen’s Houthi movement.

The Saudis have not revealed the names of the tankers and have said there was only minimal damage to one of the VLCCs.

Assessment and Analysis

More information on Ship security as a result of the civil war in Yemen

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

25/07/2018 Posn 33.25 - 14.71

Background

A charity set up to rescue migrants from the sea has brought a formal complaint against the master of a bulk carrier.

The complaint, filed with the Spanish police, alleges involuntary manslaughter and failing to provide assistance.

It follows an incident in mid-July when the charity Proactiva Open Arms was involved in a rescue off the Libyan coast.

The charity alleges that a Libyan coastguard vessel destroyed a migrant craft and left two women and a child in the water. The child and one of the women subsequently drowned.

The captain of the charity’s rescue boat claims the crew of the bulk carrier TRIADES was aware that people were adrift but failed to come to their aid.

Proactiva Open Arms is also planning legal action against the captain of the Libyan coastguard boat and “any other person who may have taken part through action or inaction.”

Assessment and Analysis

The Panama-flagged TRIADES was underway to the Libyan port of Misrata at the time of the alleged incident.

There has been no comment from the ship or its owners and Libya’s coastguard has disputed the account given by Proactiva Open Arms.

It is not clear what steps, if any, the Spanish authorities will take following the filing of the complaint.

The Libyan coast has become a major departure point for migrants heading to Europe and ships sailing in and out of Libyan ports and in the wider Mediterranean risk being involved in migrant incidents.

Merchant vessels have frequently assisted in rescues but the increasing reluctance, especially from Italy, to allow migrants to disembark in European ports means ships that take migrants on-board risk delays and diversions.

 

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page