Maritime Threat Picture

in collaboration with NORTH

Pirates board tanker and steal part of its cargo of diesel oil view more

Risk: Shipping at risk from pirate activity and land-based conflict in the Gulf of Aden, the northwest Indian Ocean and off the Somali coast. view more

UAE vessel under missile attack view more

48-hour strike at Spanish ports view more

Port terminal evacuated after claims that a container ship was carrying a 'dirty bomb' view more

Bunker company falls victim to 'phishing scam' view more

UAE appears to soften restrictions on non-Qatari vessels visiting UAE ports view more

Saudi Arabia and Bahrain join Fujairah in banning Qatari vessels view more

Port of Fujairah closed to Qatar-flagged vessels or vessels sailing to or from Qatar. view more

Risk: Drug trafficking at Puerto Cabello, Lake Maracaibo and Orinoco River ports view more

ALGERIA - Risk: Customs fines in Algeria view more

VIETNAM - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in Vietnam view more

Ice-conditions at Ukrainian ports view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Hull staining at Dakar, Senegal view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Drug trafficking in West African ports view more

SUDAN - Risk: Damage and shortage claims for bagged cargo in Port Sudan view more

UAE - Risk Possible delays caused by disembarking crew due to injury or sickness at Fujairah, UAE view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: unrest by elements of the security forces leading to disruption to port operations. view more

PERU - Risk: Robbers target ships in Callao's anchorages view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Economic crisis bringing delays and deteriorating port conditions. There are also reports of piracy, the targets being small fishing vessels. view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines imposed for sewage treatment plant effluent non-compliance view more

CHINA - Risk: Theft from ships in Tianjin anchorage view more

GUINEA - Risk: armed robbery at Conakry Anchorage view more

PHILIPPINES AND BORNEO - Threat: Attacks on vessels and kidnap of crew view more

IRAN - Risk: Iranian sanctions update view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Delays due to hull cleaning in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Fines for inaccurate bunker customs declarations in the port of Dakar, Senegal view more

INDIA - Risk: Fines and delays for seafarers failing to submit a Yellow Fever vaccination certificate in Mumbai, India view more

EGYPT - Risk: Fines and delays for breaching Suez Canal rules, Egypt view more

EGYPT- Risk: Fines for fender damage claims in Egyptian ports view more

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - Risk: Fines for unauthorised transit through marine reserve areas view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Grounding in the Parana River, Argentina view more

PERU - Risk: Unexpected charges for sludge removal services at ports in Peru view more

SAUDI ARABIA & UAE Risk: Infection from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome - Corona Virus (MERS-CoV) view more

MEXICO - Risk: Shipper's surveyor forcing Masters to accept pre-prepared non-clausable mate's receipts at Veracruz, Mexico view more

URUGUAY - Risk: Fines and delays for non-compliance with Uruguayan Oil Spill Response Organisation (OSRO) contract requirements view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Navigation through the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, Australia view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines for undeclared waste lube oils in Argentina view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines for short landing fertilizer cargoes in Argentina view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and delays for carrying out non-approved Ship to Ship (STS) operations in Angolan waters view more

LIBYA - Risk: United States Coast Guard imposes further conditions of entry for vessels arriving from Libyan ports view more

LIBYA - Risk: Ship arrest for loading banned illicit crude oil from Libya view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with Hong Kong - Air Pollution Control (Ocean Going Vessels) (Fuel at Berth) Regulations view more

USA - Risk: Fines for non-compliance with MARPOL Annex VI within the US Emission Control Area view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Self heating petroleum coke at Amuay Terminal, Venezuela view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Vessels grounding in the approaches to Douala port, Cameroon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines following illegal discharges into the Bohai Sea and China's inland waterways view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Detentions and delays arising from Port State Control (PSC) inspections and non-compliance with MLC 2006 regulations view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Cape Town view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Delays as a result of changes to ballast water sampling requirements, Ukraine view more

CHINA - Risk: The collection of tax from non-resident taxpayers engaged in international transportation business with China view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Potential shortage claims when loading bulk sulphur at Jubail, Saudi Arabia view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of paper shortage claims in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Ship arrest and customs fines as a result of fabricated coal cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BULGARIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Varna, Bulgaria view more

ROMANIA - Risk: P&I claims arising from grain cargo contamination loaded at Constantza, Romania view more

CHINA - Risk: Navigation danger due to expansion of aquaculture at Lanshan, China view more

CANADA - Risk: Ice navigation in Canadian waters during the winter months view more

CHINA - Risk: Fines, Port State Control detentions and delays for breaching regulations for passing through the Qiongzhou Straits, China view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in customs documentation at Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire view more

VENEZUELA - Risk: Misdeclared metallic iron content of Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) cargoes at San Felix, Venezuela view more

MALAYSIA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Kuantan, Malaysia, may be prone to liquefaction view more

GHANA - Risk: Fines imposed for the landing of stowaways in Takoradi, Ghana view more

GABON - Risk: Fines imposed by customs officials due to inaccuracies in port clearance documentation at Port Gentil, Gabon view more

CHINA - Risk: Fertilizer loaded in Chinese ports susceptible to caking and contamination view more

COTE D'IVOIRE - Risk: Delays resulting from port officials' refusal to land stowaways at Abidjan and San Pedro, Cote d'Ivoire view more

CHINA - Risk: Danger to navigation due to sea ice in the Baohai Sea, China view more

KUWAIT - Risk: Claims arising from grain cargo shortages in Shuwaikh port, Kuwait view more

CHINA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of fluorspar cargoes in China view more

PAKISTAN - Risk: Bulk liquid cargo shortage claims in Karachi, Pakistan view more

BRAZIL - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Trombetas, Brazil may be prone to liquefaction view more

SAUDI ARABIA - Risk: Grain cargo shortage claims at Saudi Arabian ports view more

ANGOLA - Risk: Damages and shortage claims for bagged rice cargoes to Luanda view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Potential mis-declaration of Indonesian nickel ore cargoes in Indonesia view more

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - Risk: US Environmental Protection Agency fines for noncompliance with MARPOL Annex VI low sulphur content fuels. view more

UKRAINE - Risk: Delays, detentions and fines resulting from the closure of Crimean ports view more

THAILAND - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of loading/discharging dangerous goods without permission from Thailand's Marine Safety and Environment Bureau/Harbour Department view more

CHINA/TAIWAN - Risk: Fines imposed for unapproved direct sailing between China and Taiwan view more

TURKEY - Risk: Fines for short landing of cargo at Turkish ports view more

HONG KONG - Risk: Fines for emitting dark smoke in the port of Hong Kong view more

INDONESIA - Risk: Fraudulent Port State Control (PSC) inspection charges in Indonesia view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Issues associated with loading iron ore cargo from Pepel port and Freetown anchorage view more

GHANA - Risk: Bauxite with a high moisture content loaded at Takoradi may be prone to liquefaction view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: Problems associated with the loading of bauxite on the Sherbro River, Sierra Leone view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Costs and consequences for repatriating stowaways at the port of Durban view more

NORTH AMERICA - Risk: Delays due to the discovery of Asian Gypsy Moth in Canada and the USA view more

SUDAN - Risk: Regular shortage claims following the discharge of bulk wheat at Port Sudan view more

ALGERIA -Risk: Customs fines due to shortage claims for grain cargoes shipped to Algeria view more

INDIA - Risk: Cargo claims and potential liquefaction of iron ore cargoes in Goa, India view more

MEXICO - Risk: Delays, ship arrest and problems loading iron ore cargo in Mexican ports view more

MEXICO - Risk: Drug cartel activity and acts of violence in and around Mexican port cities view more

South America - Risk: Drug Trafficking throughout South America view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Drug trafficking in West African ports view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Ships anchoring in South African coastal waters are obliged to first obtain permission from the South African Maritime Safety Authority view more

YEMEN - Risk: Sanctions and the US Department of the Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities forbid the landing of stowaways at the port of Dakar view more

CAMEROON - Risk: Fines and delays as a result of exaggerated cargo claims at the port of Douala view more

BENIN - Risk: Exaggerated shortage claims resulting in customs fines view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, delays and detention as a result of differences in oil record books and shipboard retention of oils, Yemen view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fabricated stevedore personal Injury claims in Yemeni ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Fines, ship arrest and possible delays as a result of late reporting of Fixed and Floating Object (FFO) claims in Yemen view more

WEST AFRICA - Risk: Bagged rice shortage claims in West African ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship security as a result of the civil war in Yemen view more

GHANA - Risk: Stowaways at Tema Port view more

SIERRA LEONE - Risk: associated with discharging bulk rice at ports in Sierra Leone view more

JORDAN - Risk: Bulk cargo shortage claims in the port of Aqaba view more

LIBYA - Risk: Security at Libyan Ports view more

YEMEN - Risk: Ship arrest as a result of exaggerated cargo shortage claims in Yemen view more

AUSTRALIA - Risk: Possible ship detention by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority as a consequence of using non-approved navigation charts in Australian waters view more

COLOMBIA - Risk: Possible delays caused by the Colombian Navy carrying out routine anti-drug trafficking searches in Colombia's ports (Puerto Bolivar, Puerto Neuvo and Puerto Drummond) view more

LIBYA - Risk: Sanctions and US Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List, Libya view more

YEMEN - Risk: Unexpected expenses and fines arising from the shifting of vessels, arrival draught restrictions and exceeding time allotted for discharge in Hodeida view more

SYRIA - Risk: Sanctions and the US Treasury Specially Designated Nationals List, Syria view more

TURKEY - Risk: Issues associated with loading steel products in Turkish ports view more

SOUTH AFRICA - Risk: Delays caused by ship detentions due to the discovery of armaments on board merchant vessels in South Africa view more

TUNISA - Risk: P&I claims and customs fines arising from short landing of cargo in Tunisian ports. view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Senegalese authorities robustly impose customs fines on vessels calling at Dakar view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Delays on the Parana River Argentina view more

SENEGAL - Risk: Restricted availability of bunkers at Dakar roads, Senegal view more

THAILAND - Risk: Problems associated with loading bulk and bagged sugar in Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Old, damaged bagged rice from Thailand view more

THAILAND - Risk: Potential damage to bagged rice due to dunnaging in Thailand view more

NIGERIA – Risk: Nigerian navy arrest vessels employing the services of armed security guards view more

SUDAN - Risk: Fraudulent steel transactions to Port Sudan view more

TAIWAN - Risk: Damage to nets and equipment, safe transit of the coastal fishing zones of Taiwan view more

GUATEMALA - Risk: Nickel ore can liquefy due to excessive moisture content view more

ARGENTINA - Risk: Customs fines in Argentina relating to the misdeclaration of ship's stores view more

USA - Risk: merchant vessels subject to fines and severe delays due to illegal contraband carriage, particularly from the port of Miami and Port Everglades view more

CARIBBEAN - Risk: commercial vessels being used to traffic and smuggle contraband in the Caribbean Basin, particularly to and from the Port of Spain, Trinidad, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico and Jamaica view more

ECUADOR - Risk: Drug trafficking, theft and piracy at the Ecuadorian port of Guayaquil and Puerto Bolivar view more

SPAIN - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband from North and West Africa though Algeciras (Spain) into European black markets view more

THE NETHERLANDS AND BELGIUM - Risk: vessels being used to traffic and/or smuggle contraband through the major shipping hubs of Antwerp and Rotterdam view more

LIBYA & SYRIA - Risk: Implications of the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean view more

GULF OF GUINEA - Threat: armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea region view more

GULF OF GUINEA - Threat: vessel hijack and refined petroleum product cargo theft in the Gulf of Guinea view more

BIGHT OF BONNY - Threat: kidnap of seafarers in the Bight of Bonny, offshore the Niger Delta and in the territorial waters of Gabon and Equatorial Guinea view more

SOMALIA - Somali-based pirates targeting vessels operating in the littoral waters of Somalia, the Indian ocean and Gulf of Oman view more

INDONESIA AND PHILIPPINES - Risk: nickel ore liquefaction due to excessive moisture content during voyages from the Philippines and Indonesia view more

INDONESIA - Threat: armed robbery on ships berthed at the Indonesian anchorages of Tanjung Priok, Dumai, Belawan and Taboneo view more

MALACCA STRAITS & SINGAPORE - Threat: vessel hijack and petroleum product cargo theft in the Malacca Straits / Singapore Straits and South China Sea view more

BANGLADESH - Threat: armed robbery and pilferage on vessels anchored or berthed at Chittagong and Cox's Bazar Ports, Bangladesh view more

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Current Incidents
Enduring Risks
Listed Areas
Latest Incidents
26/06/2017 Posn 3.51 - 103.75

Background

Pirates have attacked a Thai oil tanker off the Malaysian coast.

The tanker, the CP41, was boarded by at least six armed men. Reports differ as to wether the attack took place on the evening of Friday, June 23, or the evening of Saturday, June 24.

The pirates rounded up the captain and 16 crew at gunpoint, robbed them of their valuables and destroyed the ship’s security alert system.

They then spent several hours siphoning off almost half its cargo of diesel oil.

The pirates left leaving the crew unharmed. The tanker was able to continue its journey to the Thai port of Songkhla.

 

Assessment and Analysis

The CP41 was attacked close to Malaysian port of Kuantan. It had been sailing from from Singapore and was bound for Shell’s oil depot in Songkhla.

It was carrying 3.8 million litres of diesel oil. The pirates are estimated to have stolen around 1.5 million litres of product.

Thai authorities are trying to establish the nationality of the attackers. They have asked for help from the Malaysian navy in an attempt to track them down.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

19/06/2017 Posn 13.33 - 43.20

Background

The Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen says Houthi forces have fired a missile at a United Arab Emirates (UAE) ship.

The incident happened on June 14 near the Yemeni port of al-Mokha.

One member of the crew was reported injured. The ship was undamaged, according to a senior UAE military official.

Assessment and Analysis

The UAE news agency WAM said the ship, which was carrying medical supplies, was struck near al-Mokha.

The Saudi state news agency had earlier reported that the vessel had been leaving the port when it was hit.

A Houthi-run media outlet posted a video claiming to show the moment the missile struck.

Iran-backed Houthi militias have been fighting the Yemen government for over two years. The government is backed by the Saudi-led military coalition, of which the UAE is a part.

It is not the first time ships linked to the Saudi-led coalition have been targeted by Houthi forces.

In January a Saudi warship was attacked by what were described as ‘suicide boats’ and in October 2016 a UAE vessel was hit by a missile while sailing near the Bab al-Mandeb Strait.

There is a risk that fighting in the Yemen civil war could pose a threat to commercial shipping.

Three days before the latest missile attack the US-led Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), which aims to protect shipping from terrorism and piracy, said it was stepping up its presence in the western Gulf of Aden, which includes the coast off southern Yemen.

It urged ships to provide information if they were entering region so naval units could better respond to any threats.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

15/06/2017 Posn 41.31 - 2.19

Background

Spain’s dock workers are currently on a 48-hour strike (due to end at 8 am local time on Friday (June 16).

The unions, led by Coordinadora Estatal de Trabajadores del Mar (CETM), say the stoppage has hit all the country’s 39 ports.

According to a union spokeswoman only statutory minimum service has been provided.

Spanish law requires that hazardous goods and perishable goods are not imperilled by strike action. The law also requires dockers to service passenger vessels.

 

Assessment and Analysis

Unions representing Spain’s more than 6,000 dock workers oppose reforms to port hiring practices.

Months of talks between the unions, the government and port operators have failed to resolve the dispute.

The unions began a programme of strikes at the start of June.

The unions and the government estimate that over 90% of the dock labour force joined the latest 48-hour stoppage.

Reports say the strike has seen a near-complete shutdown at Algeciras, Cadiz, Santander, Alicante, Almeria, Bilbao, Pasaia and Barcelona.

More strike action is anticipated.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

15/06/2017 Posn 32.7503226078097 - -79.93652343750006

Background

The Wando Welch Terminal (WWT) in the Port of Charlestown, South Carolina, on the US east coast, was evacuated late on Wednesday (June 14) while authorities investigated claims that there was a ‘dirty bomb’ aboard the container ship MAERSK MEMPHIS.

Lt. James Zorn, spokesperson for Coast Guard Sector Charleston, said early on Thursday morning that there was ‘zero credible information’ to suggest there was a bomb aboard.

He said the agencies were investigating the threat out of ‘an overabundance of caution’.

Maersk Line, the vessel’s owner, said on Thursday that the US Coast Guard had told it of the threat and that the vessel had been evacuated immediately.

 

Assessment and Analysis

The MAERSK MEMPHIS arrived at the Charleston terminal from New York on Wednesday evening.

The security alert was triggered by two videos posted to YouTube the same day. The videos claimed the vessel was carrying a ‘dirty bomb’.

One of the videos came from what local media have called a ‘YouTube conspiracy theorist’. He said the bomb had been loaded during a port visit in Pakistan.

A ‘dirty bomb’ is generally taken to mean an explosive device loaded with radioactive or radiation polluted materials.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

14/06/2017 Posn 5.52 - 100.59

Background

A bunker company in Malaysia claims it has been the victim of a phishing scam.

The owner of the company has told police that it has been defrauded of RM4.5 million (US$ 1 million).

The Malaysian National News Agency (BERNAMA) quoted the police chief in the northwestern Malaysian state of Kedah as saying the company made two reports to the police, one on June 8 and another two days later on June 10.

It claimed it had been deceived into making two transactions to a bank in Greensboro in the United States on May 31 and June 2.

“We believe [a] spam email was sent to the company by an international syndicate, which set up an email account that is similar to the Singaporean company where it gets its oil supply from,” the police chief, Datuk Asri Yusoff, was quoted as telling a news conference.

“The complainant only realised he had been cheated after the real supplier contacted him for payment.”

Assessment and Analysis

Malaysian police believe Spyware was embedded in the victim’s computer allowing the perpetrators of the fraud to read email exchanges between the bunker company and its fuel supplier.

“After obtaining the information between the two companies, a [crime] syndicate member would create a fake email masquerading as the supplier to invoice the victim for payment into a bank account,” said the police spokesman.

He urged companies to check with their counterparties before making payments to accounts that differed from the usual number.

He said police were still investigating the incident and would cooperate with the International Police Organisation (INTERPOL).

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

13/06/2017 Posn 25.36 - 51.28

Background

Qatar has begun shipping cargo through Oman to bypass neighbouring Gulf countries that have severed sea, land and air transport links.

Qatar’s port authority said on Monday, June 12, that cargoes were being routed through the Omani ports of Sohar and Salalah.

In other developments, the United Arab Emirates’ (UAE) transport authority issued an advisory on June 11 that appeared to soften restrictions on non-Qatari vessels that had visited or were planning to visit Qatari ports.

In contrast to initial statements issued by some UAE ports it made no reference to vessels not being given port clearance if the last port of call or next port of call was Qatar.

One consequence might be that some ships sailing to or from Qatar will be allowed to bunker at the UAE port of Fujairah.

 

 

Assessment and Analysis

The main features of the sanctions against Qatar remain in place.

The latest advisory from the UAE transport authority makes it clear that UAE ports are still barred from handling any cargo of Qatari origin, receiving any Qatari-owned or -flagged vessel, or loading cargo bound for Qatar.

But the advisory makes no reference to vessels not being given port clearance if the last port of call or next port of call was Qatar.

On Monday (June 12), the day after the UAE advisory was released, the Post of Fujairah issued a circular repeating that the ban on Qatari-flagged or owned vessels remained.

Other restrictions, however, were reduced to not allowing ships to load or unload any cargo of Qatari origin or allowing ships to load UAE cargo destined for Qatar.

This is being interpreted as opening the possibility that non-Qatari vessels neither loading nor discharging Qatari cargoes will be allowed to refuel at the Fujairah bunkering hub.

The UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt cut transport links to Qatar on June 5 as part of their severing of diplomatic ties.

They accuse Qatar of destabilising the region by backing militant groups including so-called Islamic State (IS) and al-Qaeda, charges Qatar denies.

The decision to cut links took the shipping community by surprise. Shipping companies are being urged to keep a close watch on how the sanctions against Qatar are being implemented and to make provision in their contracts for any potential disruptions.

Qatari trade minister Sheikh Ahmed bin Jassim Al Thani claimed on June 12 that the moves to isolate Qatar were having little effect.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

06/06/2017 Posn 25.42 - 51.21

Background

Saudi Arabia has joined two port authorities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in banning Qatari vessels from its ports.

The Saudi Ports Authority has notified shipping agents not to accept vessels flying Qatari flags or ships owned by Qatari companies or individuals.

In a statement on its Twitter account it added that Qatari goods would not be allowed to be unloaded in Saudi ports.

“All shipping agents must comply with the order to deny entry for ships under the flag of Qatar or vessels belonging to Qatari citizens and companies,” the Ports Authority said.

The ban was announced on June 5, the same day the Port of Fujairah said that vessels flying the flag of Qatar, or sailing to or from Qatari ports, would not be allowed to call.

The Fujairah ban includes the port’s offshore bunker anchorages.

Meanwhile the UAE’s Das Port Authority had banned Qatari-flagged vessels, or ships sailing to or from Qatar, from calling into any Abu Dhabi petroleum port.

In other moves Bahrain’s Ministry of Transportation and Telecommunications said in a statement on June 6 that its ports and territorial waters would be closed to vessels heading to or from Qatar.

Assessment and Analysis

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain broke ties with Qatar on Monday (June 5), accusing it of supporting terrorism.

The countries claim Qatar is destabilising the region and that it has backed militant groups including so-called Islamic State (IS) and al-Qaeda, charges Qatar denies.

Qatar is the world’s top seller of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Observers say Qatari exports of LNG to countries outside the Arab world are unlikely to be disrupted.

Although Qatar’s Arab neighbours have cut transport links the country’s Foreign Minister, Sheikh Mohammed Bin Abdulrahman al-Thani said Qatar would “still have access to the world through international sea lanes and international airspace”.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page

05/06/2017 Posn 25.12 - 56.34

Background

The Port of Fujairah in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) says vessels flying the flag of Qatar, or sailing to or from Qatari ports, will not be allowed to call.

The ban was announced in a Notice to Mariners (number 224) issued on June 5.

It applies to the port and to the port’s offshore anchorages.

The ban will be in place until further notice.

Local sources expect other UAE Ports to follow suit.

 

Assessment and Analysis

The Port of Fujairah said the ban was part of the UAE decision to break diplomatic relations with Qatar.

As part of the ban effected vessels will not be allowed to bunker and nor will crew be allowed to join or sign off.

The UAE joined Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Bahrain on June 5 in severing ties, including transport links.

The countries accuse Qatar of destabilising the region. They claim that Qatar backs militant groups including so-called Islamic State (IS) and al-Qaeda, charges Qatar denies.

Qatar is the world’s top seller of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Observers say Qatari exports of LNG to countries outside the Arab world are unlikely to be disrupted.

Reported and analysed by North and Gray Page